Back to South Australia Contents Page

Back to previous installation (Wondergraph)

Forward to next installation (Macclesfield)

 

Glenelg Theatre (a.k.a. Seaview Theatre), Glenelg

This seaside theatre, which is usually referred to by its later name as the Seaview, housed two photoplayers in its time.

The first, installed when the theatre on Colley Terrace opened on 23 August, 1917 [Dylan Walker, "Adelaide's Silent Nights", Canberra, p.68], was a two-rank Fotoplayer (specification) which had previously been installed in the Wondergraph Theatre, Adelaide [Bill Binding, conversation with writer, September, 1975]. However, according to a contemporary press account, the Fotoplayer had been specially imported by the Pianola Company at a cost of 1000:

[The Register, 1 September, 1917, p. 9]

The player was Fred Floyd. The organ, which has already been described, was transferred in 1926 to the Strand Theatre, Glenelg.

The second instrument came from Victoria. It was a Style 50 Fotoplayer which had originally been installed in the De Luxe Theatre, Melbourne, and subsequently had briefly sojourned in a number of Hoyt's suburban Melbourne theatres before being sold to the Glenelg Theatre for 600 [Dylan Walker, "Adelaide's Silent Nights", Canberra, p.68]. It was installed by Bill Binding of Dodd & Sons, and he recalled its large size and that it was not in the best of order when it arrived. Bill also recalled that its overhaul was carried out by Jack Woods and Bill Voit, while Cliff Davies renovated the piano section [Bill Binding, conversation with writer, September, 1975].

Specification of the Style 50 Fotoplayer

A former projectionist from the theatre recalls the organ and its egregious Maestro, the late Lawrie Starr:

["Eminent Person", SA TOSA News, TOSA (SA), Adelaide, November, 1987, p. 5]

The Glenelg Theatre ceased full-time film shows in 1929 ["Eminent Person", SA TOSA News, TOSA (SA), Adelaide, November, 1987, p. 5 Note: The date given for the Glenelg Theatre's closure is 1939, but this is clearly a misprint, as the article refers to this being "only a few months after the City theatres [had installed sound]"] ,continuing with reduced screenings until 1931, when it closed altogther.  It was remodelled inside and out and reopened on 24 August, 1936[Colin Flint, The Seaview with a Sea View, "Kino Cinema Quartely", Wahroonga, Winter 2000, No. 72, p.31]. In time it was renamed the Seaview Theatre, a reference to its location facing the sea across a park area.  The Fotoplayer remained in the Seaview, but there is no record of it having been played during film shows. After years of disuse, it was purchased (around the time the theatre finally showed its last film in 1959) by the late Alf Broadbent, of Macclesfield, S.A., who installed it at his property.

The Seaview Theatre finally closed on 26 September, 1959, the building being used for the next nearly forty years as a bowling alley. The latter closed on 18 January, 1999, and the decrepit building stood unused until it was demolished in October, 1999. 

[The Seaview in April, 1998]

 

 

Back to South Australia Contents Page

Back to previous installation (Wondergraph)

Forward to next installation (Macclesfield)

This page brought to you by:
VintageHammond.Com - We Buy-Sell-Trade Vintage Hammond Organs and Roll or Kari Organ/Vending Machine Moving Dollies Order Roll or Kari Dollies Here